Smokey Robinson

The Temptations are to R&B what The Beatles are to rock and roll. And, like The Beatles, The Temps became one of the most successful groups in music history. They recorded hits, More»

Rare Earth

The last time Rare Earth was in town, there was also another concert in town­—a bigger name in a bigger venue, but for our money Rare Earth was the show to see. More»

Winter Dance Party

When John Mueller decided to create a show around Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. Richardson, a.k.a. the “Big Bopper,” he had to be very careful about it. He walked a fine More»

Lucas Hoge

Country music up-and-comer Lucas Hoge has had to be as clever about how he gets his music to the public as he is about creating memorable words and melodies. He was bound More»

Smokey Robinson

smokey-robinson

The Temptations are to R&B what The Beatles are to rock and roll. And, like The Beatles, The Temps became one of the most successful groups in music history. They recorded hits, such as “The Way You Do the Things You Do,” “Since I Lost My Baby,” and the signature hit, “My Girl.”
However, if it weren’t for a little record label by the name of Motown founded by Berry Gordy Jr., or a songwriter by the name of William “Smokey” Robinson, The Temps’ story would have had a totally different ending.

Rare Earth

rare-earth

The last time Rare Earth was in town, there was also another concert in town­—a bigger name in a bigger venue, but for our money Rare Earth was the show to see. It could have been 1974 all over again with the raw energy and sheer musicianship captured on that one stage in one night. It was a thing of beauty and that wall of incredible sound was evident no matter where in  the Avi Resort & Casino’s Ballroom a person was sitting. After witnessing such a show, we here at the Laughlin entertainer, knew we’d made the right call that night.
For all its ground-breaking accomplishments and “firsts,” Rare Earth could very well be the most underappreciated band in music history.

Winter Dance Party

Winter Dance Party

When John Mueller decided to create a show around Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. Richardson, a.k.a. the “Big Bopper,” he had to be very careful about it. He walked a fine line—he wanted to pay tribute to the music, while respecting the music and the musicians. He wanted to get it right—remembering “the day the music died,” (from Don McLean’s song “American Pie”), when all three were killed in a plane crash shortly after take off February 3, 1959, en route to Moorhead, Minnesota. It would be easy to focus on the tragedy and the loss, but Mueller went a different direction. He wanted to concentrate on the impact of the music, and what it meant to people.

Lucas Hoge

lucas-hoge

Country music up-and-comer Lucas Hoge has had to be as clever about how he gets his music to the public as he is about creating memorable words and melodies. He was bound and determined to be taken seriously as an artist from the get-go because he’s known all along thousands of other guys have those very same dreams of bathing themselves in success. He knows good songs can easily be relegated to a dusty shelf somewhere so it’s been important to him do more than shop his songs to record labels.
The small-town Nebraska native hit the ground running once he moved to Nashville, pouncing on any opportunity he could, and it wasn’t long before people began to take notice. His hard work and tenacity are starting to pay off.